Category Archives: unusual words

Do You Know the Meanings of These Christmas Carol Words?

imagesChristmas carols. You listen to them.You sing them.
But do you know the meanings of all the words?

Xmas-Quiz.jpg

Let’s see if you can guess the meanings of the words and phrases in boldface type. (Answers below)

From “Away in a Manger”
“The cattle are lowing; the poor baby wakes.”

From “Deck the Halls”
“Troll the ancient Yuletide carol.”

From “The Wassail Song”
“Here we come a-wassailing among the leaves so green”

wen5From “Good King Wenceslas”
“Good King Wenceslas looked out on the Feast of Stephen
“Sire, he lives a good league hence underneath the mountain”

From “It Came Upon a Midnight Clear”
“Still through the cloven skies they come”

4504007_640pxFrom “Ding Dong Merrily on High.”
“Ding dong, verily the sky is riv’n with angel singing”

From “Oh, Come All Ye Faithful”
“We too would thither bend our joyful footsteps.”

From “Angels We Have Heard On High”
“Gloria in excelsis Deo.”

Two bonus questions . . .

Which song title has the correct punctuation?
“God Rest Ye, Merry Gentlemen”
“God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen”

What does the word “carol” mean?

Answers:

carolers-christmas-carolers-nyc-new-york-mistletones-hipster-carolers-new-york-city-holiday-singers-seo31

Lowing is that low mooing sound that cows make.

To troll means “to sing loudly.”

A-wassailing is going door-to-door singing Christmas carols.

The Feast of Stephen is a special day held in the Catholic Church on December 26 in honor of St. Stephen; it is also known as “Boxing Day.” League is a distance measure equaling about three miles.

Cloven means “split” or “divided in two.” In this song it refers to clouds parting in the sky to reveal God’s angels.

Verily is a synonym for “truly” and riven is another adjective for “split.”

Thither bend means “to move toward something.”

Gloria in excelsis Deo is is Latin for “Glory to God in the highest”.

“God Rest Ye Merry, Gentlemen” is correct, not “God Rest Ye, Merry Gentlemen.” The phrase “rest ye merry” is used here to mean “rest assured.”

Carol comes from the Greek word “choros” which means “dancing in a circle,” and from the French word “carole” which means, “a song to accompany dancing.”

How well did you do?

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Filed under Christmas, fun with words, Uncategorized, unusual words, words

Modern Words That Came From Lewis Carroll’s ‘Jabberwocky’

Did you know that Lewis Carroll’s nonsense poem, “Jabberwocky,” gave us words that we use today?

The web site “Interesting Literature” recently published an article about the poem’s affect on the English language. Today, I’m sharing part of that article with you,

but first here’s the Jabberwoky poem with a twist
(set to music by the Scottish singer/songwriter, Donovan):

The following is from “Five Fascinating Facts about Jabberwocky” (InterestingLiterature.com)

1. The poem ‘Jabberwocky’ gave us a number of new words which are now in common use. The most famous of these is ‘chortle’, a kind of laugh that is a blend of a ‘chuckle’ and a ‘snort’. But the poem – which was written, of course, by Lewis Carroll – also gave us the word ‘galumph’ (to walk clumsily and noisily) and ‘slithy’, in the sense of ‘lithe and slimy’. ‘Jabberwocky’ may also have influenced our modern use of the word ‘mimsy’, though this remains difficult to determine (‘mimsy’ already existed with a similar meaning, though Carroll’s poem probably helped to popularise it).

2. Humpty Dumpty, who explains the poem to Alice, also invented another word. The term ‘portmanteau word’ is now used by linguists to describe words such as ‘chortle’ and ‘slithy’ which combine, or blend, the sounds and meanings of two existing words. (Other famous examples include ‘brunch’, from ‘breakfast’ and ‘lunch’, and, more recently, ‘chillax’, from ‘chill’ and ‘relax’.) In Carroll’s novel Through the Looking-Glass (1871), Humpty Dumpty tells a bemused Alice: ‘You see it’s like a portmanteau – there are two meanings packed up into one word.’ A portmanteau is a sort of case or bag which opens out flat into two halves – so Humpty’s use of the term (we hope he won’t mind us assuming first-name terms with him, but if he does – well, he’s an egg, for goodness’ sake) is a sort of metaphorical representation of the two halves of a ‘portmanteau’ word, whose meanings and sounds are then packed up into one unit (e.g. brunch). ‘Portmanteau’, by the way, literally means ‘cloak-carrier’, since the bag was used to carry clothes around.

3. There is a computer program inspired, and named after, ‘Jabberwocky’. The poet and new media artist Neil Hennessy created JABBER: The Jabberwocky Engine, a Java program which can generate neologisms, or new coinages, much in the manner of Carroll’s poem. Random letters are programmed to group together into probable English words. It’s an intriguing idea, though perhaps nonsense poets will be rendered obsolete by the program? We hope not – and we doubt it.

Interested? Do you want more?

Read the entire article: “FIVE Fascinating Facts About Jabberwocky”
on the Interesting Literature website.

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9 out of 10 Writers are Guilty of “Doing Quisby.” Are You?

Do you hang out on social media when you should be writing?
Then you are guilty of doing quisby

an old slang term for idling away your time. But don’t worry, you are not alone. When the muse is silent most writers will do anything to avoid writing.

Some are bedpressers, sleeping in until their muse wakes them, or maybe sleeping late because the muse woke them in the middle of the night.

An elusive muse might cause writers to let out an unexpected, guttural humdudgeon—a loud complaint or noise. (An alternate meaning for humdudgeon is “an imaginary illness or pain,” and there’s another excuse for not writing.)

A missing muse can lead to phobias like ergophobia, the fear of work, and allodoxaphobia, the fear of other people’s opinions. (“Here you are procrastinating instead of writing.”) And not writing when you should be writing can lead to kakkorhapiophobia, the fear of failure.

Writers who have Cacoethes scribendi (a Latin term meaning “a compulsive desire to write”) suffer terribly when their muse disappears for a while. They might use alcohol to soothe the pain and become capernoited— “slightly muddled in the head as a result of drink.”

Other writers resort to accismus.

Accismus: (noun) The pretended refusal of something one keenly desires.
“I didn’t really want to write today anyhow.”

Most writers know that eventually their muse will return and everything will be oojah-cum-spiff, a phrase meaning “just fine” created by P.G. Wodehouse, one of the most widely read humorists of the 20th century.

Maybe you are a cunctator. You are if you should be writing but are here doing quisby. A cunctator is a person who procrastinates.

Does that describe you?
Then get busy and start writing!

 But don’t forget to come back here to the blog the next time you’re doing quisby.

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Thanks to the web site Interesting Literature for these wonderful words. You might also enjoy my post 9 out of 10 Writers Have Hypergraphia. Do You?

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Are you on Facebook? Check out my page where I post daily articles and inspiration for writers. And while you’re there, I’d appreciate it if you’ll click on the “like” button near the top of the page. Thanks!

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*NOTE: Any ads appearing in this post were not put there by me nor do I endorse them. WordPress sometimes posts ads in exchange for hosting this free blog.

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Filed under fun with words, unusual words, words